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Upcoming Events

Creative Nonfiction: An Intensive Workshop
Port Townsend Writers' Conference
Centrum
Fort Worden State Park
Port Townsend, Washington
Sunday, July 12 through Saturday, July 18, 2015
I am returning to my all-time favorite writers' conference for the sixth time, after a two-year break. For the first time, I'll be teaching a morning workshop, working with 14 writers each morning as they hone their craft. I will also give an afternoon craft lecture and evening reading.

Reading with Pam Houston
Wheeler Theater, Fort Worden
Monday, July 13, 2015
7:00 pm

Craft Lecture: "When You Have a Sense of Place, What Exactly Do You Have? (And where did that idea come from, anyway?)"
Schoolhouse, Fort Worden
Tuesday, July 14, 1:00 to 1:50 pm

The Port Townsend Writers Conference is a ten-day wonder of literary learning, celebration, and community. I have attended many a writers' conference and this one is my favorite. Register for this fabulous conference here.

Panel Discussion: A New "I" on Nature,"
with Stephanie Elizondo Griest, Angela Pelster, and Yelizaveta Renfro, moderated by Clint Crockett Peters
NonfictioNow Conference
University of North Arizona
Flagstaff, Arizona
Thursday, October 30, 2015


The first-person essay has a formidable history in the field of nature writing. By “nature writing,” we mean the traditional and well-challenged notion of a first person seer engaging with landscape and species, dissecting wilderness and animal experience. This, of course, is not the only way to define “nature writing.” Many eco-writers and critics have been hard at work in the last twenty years parsing out different streams of the environmental genre: eco-feminism, eco-justice literature, eco-post-colonial literature, post-humanism, and many, many others. The stream we follow today is the personal environmental essay as seen in the context of contemporary writers as they engage with the more-than-human world. “More-than-human,” includes rocks, animals, trees, insects, carbon-dioxide, and effluent but does not mean “without humans.” As one of the pioneers of ecocriticism, Lawrence Buell, writes, “Personhood is defined for better or for worse by environmental entanglement. Whether individual or social, being doesn’t stop at the border of the skin.”

 

Please see my "teaching" page for information about my upcoming writing workshops.

You can read about past events here.



Pipila


Listen to several radio interviews:

About editing, translation, and writing:

Shelagh Shapiro's "Write the Book," October 2014 (60 minutes)

About my book, No Word for Welcome:

KPFK, Los Angeles, June 2011 (20 minutes)

"Conversations," Seattle, July 2011 (10 minutes)

Public Radio International's "The World," Boston, August 2011 (8 minutes)

Shelagh Shapiro's "Write the Book," September 2011 (60 minutes)

Iowa Public Radio's "Exchanges," October 2011 (25 minutes)

Texas Public Radio's "Some Books Considered," January 2012
(10 minutes)

Viewpoints, February 2012
(10 minutes)

Listen to audio recordings of two of my readings here:

Seattle University,
January 2009

Jack Straw Writers Program,
Seattle, March 2008

See past events here.

Photo above: The call to assembly
in the village of Pipila, Isthmus of Tehuantepec, Oaxaca, Mexico, 2000. Photo courtesy of UCIZONI.
Photo to right: Mr. McElroy tells the history of his community, Monkey
Point, on the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua, 2001.
Mr. McElroy